Archive for the ‘Bug Tracking’ Category

Reimagining the nature of privacy in Launchpad (part 3)

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

We are reimagining the nature of privacy in Launchpad. The goal of the disclosure feature is to introduce true private projects, and we are reconciling the contradictory implementations of privacy in bugs and branches.

Launchpad will use policies instead of roles to govern who has access to a kind of privacy

We are implementing three kinds of policies, proprietary, embargoed security, and user data. The maintainer is the default member of these policies. The maintainer can share a kind or private data by adding a user or team to a policy.

For proprietary projects, the maintainer can add their organisational teams to the proprietary policy to share all the project information with the team members.

For Ubuntu, the maintainer will set the apport bot to be the only user in the user data policy; user data is only shared with a bot that removes personal data so that the bug can be made public. The Ubuntu security team will be the only users in the security policy.

Most maintainers will want to add project drivers to the policies if they use drivers. Bug supervisors can be added as well, though the team must be exclusive (moderated or restricted).

You can still subscribe a user or team to a private bug or branch and Launchpad will also permit the user to access it without sharing everything with the user. The existing behaviour will continue to work but it will be an exception to the normal rules.

Polices replace the bug-subscription-on-privacy-change rules. If you have every had to change the bug supervisor for a project with many private bugs, you can rejoice. You will not need to manually update the subscriptions to the private bugs to do what Launchpad implied would happen. Subscriptions are just about notification. You will not be notified of proprietary changes is proprietary information is not shared with you. Sharing kinds or information via policy means that many existing private bugs without subscribers will finally be visible to project members who can fix the issue.

Reimagining the nature of privacy in Launchpad (part 2)

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

We are reimagining the nature of privacy in Launchpad. The goal of the disclosure feature is to introduce true private projects, and we are reconciling the contradictory implementations of privacy in bugs and branches.

We are adding a new kind of privacy called “Proprietary” which will work differently than the current forms of privacy.

The information in proprietary data is not shared between projects. The conversations, client, customer, partner, company, and organisation data are held in confidence. proprietary information is unlikely to every be made public.

Many projects currently have private bugs and branches because they contain proprietary information. We expect to change these bugs from generic private to proprietary. We know that private bugs and branches that belong to projects that have only a proprietary license are intended to be proprietary. We will not change bugs that are public, described as security, or are shared with another project.

This point is a subtle change from what I have spoken and written previously. We are not changing the current forms of privacy. We do not assume that all private things are proprietary. We are adding a new kind of privacy that cannot be shared with other projects to ensure the information is not disclosed.

Launchpad currently permits projects to have default private bugs and branches. These features exist for proprietary projects. We will change the APIs to clarify this. eg:

    project.private_bugs = True  => project.default_proprietary_bugs = True
    project.setBranchVisibilityTeamPolicy(FORBIDDEN) => project.default_proprietary_branches = True

Projects with commercial subscriptions will get the “proprietary” classification. Project contributors will be able to classify their bugs and branches as proprietary. The maintainers will be able to enable default proprietary bugs and branches.

Next part: Launchpad will use policies instead of roles to govern who has access to a kind of privacy.

Reimagining the nature of privacy in Launchpad (part 1)

Monday, February 13th, 2012

We are reimagining the nature of privacy in Launchpad. The goal of the disclosure feature is to introduce true private projects, and we are reconciling the contradictory implementations of privacy in bugs and branches.

We must change the UI to accommodate the a kind of privacy, and we must change some existing terms because to avoid confusion.

We currently have two checkboxes, Private and Security that create 4 combined states:

  • Public
  • Public Security
  • Private Security
  • Private something else

Most private bugs in Launchpad are private because they contain user data. You might think at first that something that is just private is proprietary. This is not the so. Ubuntu took advantage of defects in Launchpad’s conflation of subscription and access to address a kind of privacy we did not plan for. Most private bugs in Launchpad are owned by Ubuntu. They were created by the apport bug reporting process and may contain personal user data. These bugs cannot be made public until they are redacted or purged of user data. We reviewed a sample of private bugs that belong to public projects and discovered more than 90% were made private because they contained user data. Since project contributors cannot hide or edit bug comments, they chose to make the bug private to protect the user. Well done. Launchpad needs to clarify when something contains user data so that everyone knows that it cannot
be made public without removing the personal information.

Public and private security bugs represent two states in a workflow. The goal of every security bug is to be resolved, then made public so that users are informed. People who work on these issues do not use “public” and “private”, they use “unembargoed” and “embargoed”.

Also, when I view something that is private, Launchpad needs to tell me why. The red privacy banner shown on Launchpad pages must tell me why something is private. Is it because the page contains user data, proprietary information, or an embargoed security issue? This informs me if the thing could become public.

When I want to change somethings visibility, I expect Launchpad to show me a choice that clearly states my options. Launchpad’s pickers currently shows me a term without an explanation, yet Launchpad’s code does contain the term’s definition. Instead of making me search help.launchpad.net (in vain), the picker must inform me. Given the risks of disclosing personal user data or proprietary information, I think an informative picker is essential. I expect to see something like this when I open the visibility picker for a bug:

Branches require a similar, if not identical way of describing their kind of information. I am not certain branches contain user data, but if one did, it would be clear that the branch should not be visible to everyone and should not be merged until the user data is removed.

Next post: We are adding a new kind of privacy called “Proprietary” which will work differently than the current forms of privacy.

New feature – Customise your bug listings

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

Custom Bug Listings

Over the past few months the Launchpad Orange Squad has been working to make it easier to get the information that matters to you from bug listings.

A lot of you have said in the past that you’d like to be able to filter bugs in a way that works best for you. Hopefully this new feature, with its customisable functionality should help with this goal, filling your screen with more of what you want to see.

Custom bug listings green bug

Features

You can now sort bugs by criteria such as name, importance, status and age. You can switch on the criteria that you use most and turn off criteria that you don’t use. So if you always like to see bug age, but aren’t interested in heat, you can switch on age and switch off heat, and so on.

bug column screen shot

Display

We’ve also redesigned how bug listings are displayed – fitting more information into each bug listing, and adding sort options such as bug age, assignee, reporter, and tags.

You can put your results into ascending or descending order without having to reload the page, and you’ll be able to save your preferred layout, so your settings will be saved for the next time you need to look over your bugs.

User research

This was my first main project since joining the Launchpad team back in November as the new Usability & Communications Specialist. User research has played an important part in how we’ve defined the feature and the decisions the team has made to improve the display, wording and functionality.

A number of you took part in one to one interviews, at group sessions at UDS-P and by taking part in an online survey. Thanks to everyone involved – what you told us has really helped to make this feature a more user-friendly experience. Some of our user research results (link) are already available online, with more being added soon. We’ll be carrying out some further tests in the weeks ahead, so please get in touch if you’d like to get involved.

Bugs

Every new feature has teething problems, and custom bug listings is no different. We still have a number of bugs that need tweaking, so please bear with us, and file any bugs if you spot anything that’s still out there.

Customisable bug listings in beta!

Thursday, November 24th, 2011

A custom bugThe information displayed with bug listings is often not what you want to see – you might not be interested in bug heat and want to see bug age, but it’s not there.  Looking at this problem, we’ve come up with a new beta feature: custom bug listings.  A lot of you have said that you’d like to be able to filter bugs in a way that works best for you. Hopefully this new functionality should help with this goal:

  • You’ll be able to sort bugs by criteria such as name, importance and status.
  • You can put them into ascending or descending order without having to reload the page.
  • You’ll be able to save your preferred layout.

We’ve also redesigned how bug listings are displayed – fitting more information into each bug listing, and adding sort options such as bug age, assignee, reporter, and tags.

We’ve done some successful rounds of user testing and would love to hear your options on this great new feature. We’ve just released it into beta. To see it, you need to be part of Launchpad Beta Testers. To try it out, take a look at any bugs listing, like this one for Openstack.

Let us know how you get on with it: either report a bug (using the bug tag bug-columns) or join us on launchpad-users.

2011/11/28 update: we have temporarily suspended the beta, but we’ll have it back in the next day or so

Photo by Stephen Fulljames. Licence: CC-BY-SA.

 

Ending support for multi-tenancy

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Launchpad is ending support for multi-tenancy for branches and bugs to ensure that projects can manage the disclosure of private information. This is a fundamental change to how launchpad permits communities to share projects. Very few users will be affected by this change, but several communities will need to change how they work with private bugs and branches.

Launchpad currently permits users to create private bugs or branches that cannot be seen by the project maintainers, or the project’s other communities. This feature permits communities and companies to develop features in secret until they are ready to share their work with the other communities. This exclusivity feature is difficult to use, difficult to maintain, and makes Launchpad slow. This feature also contradicts the project maintainer’s need to be informed and to manage the disclosure of confidential information. When multiple parties can control privacy on a project, important information is lost.

While discussing the proposed changes with Launchpad stakeholders, I was surprised that most believed that the project maintainers could see the private bugs they were reporting — they wanted to collaborate, but the subscription-as-access mechanism is faulty. There are thousands of private bugs reported in Launchpad that cannot be fixed because the person who can fix the issue is not subscribed.

A contributing reason to drop support for private branches on project you do not maintain is that the feature is fundamentally broken. Privacy is inherited from the base branch. If you cannot access the base branch your branch is stacked on, you are locked out. Project owners can, and accidentally do, lock out contributors. You cannot subscribe someone to review the security concerns in your branch if that user does not have access to the base branch. Project contributors must subscribe each other to their respective branches to collaborate on a fix or feature.

This change is a part of a super-feature called Disclosure. To ensure that confidential data is not accidentally disclosed, project maintainers will be able to view and change who has access to confidential project information. Maintainers can add users to security or proprietary policies to grant access to all the information in the respective policy. You will not need to subscribe users to individual bugs or branches, unless you want to grant an exception to a user to access one confidential piece of information.

Removing a project from a shared bug report

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Launchpad will soon permit you to say your project is not affected by a bug shared with another project — you can delete the spurious bug task. This action can be done from the bug’s web page, and using Launchpad API.

You can remove a project from a bug if you are the project maintainer, bug supervisor, or are the person who added the project to the bug. This action can only be performed when the bug affects more than one project — you cannot delete an entire bug. This feature permits you to undo mistakes.

Launchpad beta testers will see the remove action next to the affected project name in the affects table.

Delete spurious bugs

The delete() method was added to the bug_task entry in the Launchpad API. There is a example API script, delete_bugtasks.py, that can remove a project from many bugs. There is also a split action to create a separate bug just for the specified project to track separate conversations in bug comments.

Usage: delete_bugtasks.py [options] bug_id:project_name [bug_id:project_name]

Options:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -v, --verbose
  -q, --quiet
  -f, --force           Delete or split bug tasks that belong to a public bug
  -d, --delete          Delete a spurious project bug task from a bug
  -s, --split           Split a project bug task from an existing bug so that
                        the issue can be tracked separately
  -w WEBSITE, --website=WEBSITE
                        The URI of Launchpad web site.
                        Default: https://api.launchpad.net;
                        Alternates: https://api.staging.launchpad.net,

https://api.qastating.launchpad.net

Previously, you could not remove spurious bug reports about your project. Many were cause by poor bug target management; you could not move a bug between projects and distributions. You can now move bugs between projects and distributions, but thousands of bugs still wrongly claim to affect a project or distribution. This causes clutter on bug pages and searches, and it causes Launchpad performance problems.

This change is a part of a super-feature called Disclosure. To ensure that confidential data is not accidentally disclosed, Launchpad will only permit private bugs to affect a single project. Soon, you may need to remove a project from a bug before marking the bug private.

Finding bugs that affect you

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

We’ve recently deployed two features that make it easier to find bugs that you’re previously said affect you:

1: On your personal bugs page, there’s now an Affecting bugs that shows all these bugs.

2: On a project, distribution or source package bug listing page, there’s now a “Bugs affecting me” filter on the right (for example, bugs affecting you in the Launchpad product).

Counts of the number of affected users already help developers know which bugs are most urgent to fix, both directly and by feeding into Launchpad’s bug heat heuristic. With these changes, the “affects me” feature will also make it easier for you to keep an eye on these bugs, without having to subscribe to all mail from them.

screenshot of "This bug affects me" control

Automatic confirmation

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

ConfirmYou report a bug. Someone clicks “This affects me too” or marks the bug as a duplicate of another bug report.

Both of those are confirmation of your bug, right?

That’s what we think and members of the Ubuntu community agree.

So, from now on, that’s what’ll happen with New Ubuntu and Launchpad project bugs.

To recap: Launchpad will mark Confirmed any Ubuntu or Launchpad bug that has the New status and affects more than one person or is marked as a dupe.

Oh, but it doesn’t count if you mark your own bug as a dupe of another bug you reported.

We’re considering rolling this out for all projects in Launchpad. If your project uses Launchpad as its bug tracker, let us know what you think.

Photo by Seth Anderson. Licence: CC-BY-SA

Tag change emails make more sense

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

Small thing this: when you change a tag on a bug, the email notification from Launchpad describes it as removing the original tag and adding a new tag.

That makes sense but something slightly irritating was that Launchpad would order the email like this:

Tags added: qa-needstesting
Tags removed: qa-untestable

The reverse order always seemed more sensible to me: i.e. first show the tags that were removed and then show the tags that were added.

Well, I wasn’t the only one to think that way and I’m glad to say that my team-mate Huw has fixed it so that bug mails now show the tags removed before the tags added.