Ending support for multi-tenancy

Launchpad is ending support for multi-tenancy for branches and bugs to ensure that projects can manage the disclosure of private information. This is a fundamental change to how launchpad permits communities to share projects. Very few users will be affected by this change, but several communities will need to change how they work with private bugs and branches.

Launchpad currently permits users to create private bugs or branches that cannot be seen by the project maintainers, or the project’s other communities. This feature permits communities and companies to develop features in secret until they are ready to share their work with the other communities. This exclusivity feature is difficult to use, difficult to maintain, and makes Launchpad slow. This feature also contradicts the project maintainer’s need to be informed and to manage the disclosure of confidential information. When multiple parties can control privacy on a project, important information is lost.

While discussing the proposed changes with Launchpad stakeholders, I was surprised that most believed that the project maintainers could see the private bugs they were reporting — they wanted to collaborate, but the subscription-as-access mechanism is faulty. There are thousands of private bugs reported in Launchpad that cannot be fixed because the person who can fix the issue is not subscribed.

A contributing reason to drop support for private branches on project you do not maintain is that the feature is fundamentally broken. Privacy is inherited from the base branch. If you cannot access the base branch your branch is stacked on, you are locked out. Project owners can, and accidentally do, lock out contributors. You cannot subscribe someone to review the security concerns in your branch if that user does not have access to the base branch. Project contributors must subscribe each other to their respective branches to collaborate on a fix or feature.

This change is a part of a super-feature called Disclosure. To ensure that confidential data is not accidentally disclosed, project maintainers will be able to view and change who has access to confidential project information. Maintainers can add users to security or proprietary policies to grant access to all the information in the respective policy. You will not need to subscribe users to individual bugs or branches, unless you want to grant an exception to a user to access one confidential piece of information.

One Response to “Ending support for multi-tenancy”

  1. Martin Pool Says:

    This doesn’t make it totally clear what “multi-tenancy” really means. :)

    I think you’re saying that project maintainers will be able to see all their project’s bugs and branches, and that private bugs can only affect one project?

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