Posts Tagged ‘front-page’

Bug emails now use the bug’s address in the From: header

Wednesday, May 20th, 2020

The From: addresses used by Launchpad’s bug notifications have changed, to improve the chances of our messages being delivered over modern internet email.

Launchpad sends a lot of email, most of which is the result of Launchpad users performing some kind of action. For example, when somebody adds a comment to a bug, Launchpad sends that comment by email to everyone who’s subscribed to the bug.

Most of Launchpad was designed in an earlier era of internet email. In that era, it was perfectly reasonable to take the attitude that we were sending email on behalf of the user – in effect, being a fancy mail user agent or perhaps a little like a mailing list – and so if we generated an email that’s a direct result of something that a user did and consisting mostly of text they wrote, it made sense to put their email address in the From: header. Reply-To: was set so that replies would normally go to the appropriate place (the bug, in the case of bug notifications), but if somebody wanted to go to a bit of effort to start a private side conversation then it was easy to do so; and if email clients had automatic address books then those wouldn’t get confused because the address being used was a legitimate address belonging to the user in question.

Of course, some people always wanted to hide their addresses for obvious privacy reasons, so since 2006 Launchpad has had a “Hide my email address from other Launchpad users” switch (which you can set on your Change your personal details page), and since 2010 Launchpad has honoured this for bug notifications, so if you have that switch set then your bug comments will be sent out as something like “From: Your Name <bug-id@bugs.launchpad.net>“. This compromise worked tolerably well for a while.

But spammers and other bad actors ruin everything, and the internet email landscape has changed. It’s reasonably common now for operators of email domains to publish DMARC policies that require emails whose From: headers are within that domain to be authenticated in some way, and this is incompatible with the older approach. As a result, it’s been getting increasingly common for Launchpad bug notifications not to be delivered because they failed these authentication checks. Regardless of how justifiable our notification-sending practices were, we have to exist within the reality of internet email as it’s actually deployed.

So, thanks to a contribution from Thomas Ward, Launchpad now sends all its bug notifications as if the user in question had the “Hide my email address from other Launchpad users” switch set: that is, they’ll all appear as something like “From: Your Name <bug-id@bugs.launchpad.net>“. Over time we expect to extend this sort of approach to the other types of email that we send, possibly with different details depending on the situation.

Please let us know if this causes any strange behaviour in your email client. We may not be able to fix all of them, depending on how they interact with DMARC’s requirements, but we’d like to be aware of what’s going on.

Launchpad news, March 2019 – July 2019

Tuesday, August 6th, 2019

Here’s a brief changelog of what we’ve been up to since our last general update.

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Launchpad news, February 2019

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

Here’s a brief changelog for this month.

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Launchpad news, July 2018 – January 2019

Thursday, February 21st, 2019

Here’s a brief changelog of what we’ve been up to since our last general update.

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Launchpad news, June 2018

Friday, July 6th, 2018

Here’s a brief changelog for this month.

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Launchpad news, May 2018

Saturday, June 2nd, 2018

Here’s a brief changelog for this month.

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Launchpad news, June 2017 – April 2018

Tuesday, May 1st, 2018

Once again it’s been a while since we posted a general update, so here’s a changelog-style summary of what we’ve been up to.  As usual, this changelog preserves a reasonable amount of technical detail, but I’ve omitted changes that were purely internal refactoring with no externally-visible effects.

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Launchpad news, May 2017

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

Here’s a brief changelog for this month.

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Launchpad news, November 2015 – April 2017

Friday, April 28th, 2017

Well, it’s been a while!  Since we last posted a general update, the Launchpad team has become part of Canonical’s Online Services department, so some of our efforts have gone into other projects.  There’s still plenty happening with Launchpad, though, and here’s a changelog-style summary of what we’ve been up to.

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Git-to-Git imports

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

Launchpad has had Git-to-Bazaar code imports since 2009, along with imports from a few other systems.  These form part of Launchpad’s original mission to keep track of free software, regardless of where it’s hosted.  They’re also very useful for automatically building other artifacts, such as source package recipes or snap packages, from code hosted elsewhere.  Unfortunately they’re quite complicated: they need to be able to do a full round-trip conversion of every revision from the other version control system, which has made it difficult to add support for Git features such as signed commits or submodules.  Once one of these features is present anywhere in the history of a branch, importing it to Bazaar becomes impossible.  This has been a headache for many users.

We can do better nowadays.  As of last year, we have direct Git hosting support in Launchpad, and we can already build snaps and recipes straight from Git, so we can fulfil our basic goal more robustly now with a lot less code.  So, Launchpad now supports Git-to-Git code imports, also known as Git mirroring.  You can use this to replace many uses of Git-to-Bazaar imports (note that there’s no translations integration yet, and of course you won’t be able to branch the resulting import using bzr).

See our Git documentation for more details.