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Welcome to BerliOS projects

Published by Matthew Revell October 10, 2011 in General

It’s sad to read that BerliOS will close in December, after nearly twelve years of serving open source projects. One fewer project hosting site means that the open source world is that bit poorer.

If you’ve been hosting your project on the BerliOS Developer platform and you’re looking for a new home, you’ve got plenty of choice.

We’d love to welcome you to Launchpad and here are a few reasons why you should consider Launchpad:

If you have questions, you’re very welcome to join us in #launchpad on FreeNode and the launchpad-users mailing list.


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Finding bugs that affect you

Published by Martin Pool October 4, 2011 in Bug Tracking, Coming changes, Cool new stuff, General

We’ve recently deployed two features that make it easier to find bugs that you’re previously said affect you:

1: On your personal bugs page, there’s now an Affecting bugs that shows all these bugs.

2: On a project, distribution or source package bug listing page, there’s now a “Bugs affecting me” filter on the right (for example, bugs affecting you in the Launchpad product).

Counts of the number of affected users already help developers know which bugs are most urgent to fix, both directly and by feeding into Launchpad’s bug heat heuristic. With these changes, the “affects me” feature will also make it easier for you to keep an eye on these bugs, without having to subscribe to all mail from them.

screenshot of "This bug affects me" control


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Launchpad now accepts mail commands from gmail

Published by Martin Pool October 1, 2011 in Cool new stuff, General

If you use gmail, you should now be able to send commands to Launchpad without gpg-signing.

gmail puts a DKIM cryptographic signature on outgoing mail, which is a cryptographic signature that proves that the mail was sent by gmail and that it was sent by the purported user. We verify the signature on Launchpad and treat that mail as trusted which means, for example, that you can triage bugs over mail or vote on merge proposals. Previously you needed to GPG-sign the mail which is a bit of a hassle for gmail.

(DKIM is signed by the sending domain, not by the user, so it doesn’t inherently prove that the purported sender is the actual one. People could intentionally or unintentionally set up a server that allows intra-domain impersonation, and it’s reported to be easy to misconfigure DKIM signers so that this happens. (Consider a simple SMTP server that accepts, signs and forwards everything from 192.168/16 with no authentication.) However, in cases like gmail we can reasonably assume Google don’t allow one user to impersonate another. We can add other trusted domains on request.)

If you have gmail configured to use some other address as your From address it will still work, as long as you verify both your gmail address and your other address.

You can use email commands to interact with both bugs and code merge proposals. For instance when Launchpad sends you mail about a new bug, you can just reply

  status confirmed
  importance medium

Thanks for letting us know!

We do this using the pydkim library.

Note that you do need at least one leading space before the commands.

If you hit any bugs, let us know.


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Deployment reports are now public

Published by Matthew Revell September 30, 2011 in General

Steve Kowalik writes:

For a while now Launchpad has been using deployment reports that tell us what state our QA is in, which revisions are safe to deploy to production, or which revisions are not safe to deploy since they failed QA.

Some time ago, I started the process to make these reports public, and I’m proud to announce that today, they are!

If you’re waiting to see when your code in Launchpad is likely to go live, take a look at the new public deployment report.


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Less mail about translation imports

Published by Martin Pool September 28, 2011 in Translations

Continuing on from our earlier work of sending less but better mail and making it faster to import i18n translation templates: Launchpad will no longer send mail when it successfully imports a template. You can see in the web ui when the template was last imported, and you will still get mail if there’s a problem.

I could hardly put it better than Riddell:

Danilo asked for my reasoning. My reasoning is that pointless e-mails are a pain.

Big pile of junk mail from Verizon

(I hope we’ll eventually have a more structured notification model, that will let you choose to see some notifications by mail and others in the web ui. One step at a time.)


0

Translation imports: making approval conflicts visible

Published by Jeroen T. Vermeulen September 19, 2011 in Translations

If you use Launchpad’s Translations feature, then as of today, you may notice a new kind of error for uploads in your translations import queue. Look for the “info” icon next to your upload’s status, and click to unfold. The error message says “Can’t auto-approve upload: it’s not clear what template it belongs to.”

Sample

You may find this annoying, and as the person responsible, let me apologize. I hope when I’m done explaining, it won’t seem so bad.

To the right is an example of the error.  Click it to see more.

Where does the error come from? Actually it’s a problem that’s always been there, but instead of telling you about it, we Launchpad developers tried to hide the complexity from you and take care of it all ourselves. And we weren’t keeping up. Some of your uploaded translations would just sit in the queue forever, with status Needs Review, for no clear reason. All that’s changing now is that Launchpad will tell you when this happens, so that you can deal with it without waiting for us.

Why do some translations sit in the queue forever?

Every translation you make in Launchpad has to go into a specific template and language. Usually it’s obvious where you want your translation to go: when you translate in Launchpad’s web UI, you’re already on the page for a specific template and language. If you have upload privileges for the project and language, you can follow the upload link from that same translation page and again it’s obvious which template you’re translating and to what language. If you always upload the same file with exactly the same name and path, new uploads of that file go to the same place as before. But what if you upload a new file from the release-series page, or the translation comes in from a Bazaar branch or an automated build?

Then it’s up to a script we call the Translations Import Queue Gardener. The Gardener periodically scans all waiting uploads—the ones marked Needs Review—and tries more advanced ways of matching them up with known templates and languages. When it finds a match, it approves the upload’s import to the template and language it has found.

One of the Gardener’s most important tools is a template’s ”translation domain.” This is a simple name; no slashes or weird characters allowed. Launchpad figures out a template’s domain when you first import the template, based on its directory path. In principle a template’s domain should identify the template uniquely on the end-user’s system, but Launchpad isn’t as strict about it. It just assumes that the domain name is tied to the template file’s path within a project’s source tree. You probably shouldn’t, but you can give your project two templates with the same domain if you want.

When you upload a translation, the Gardener tries to figure out its translation domain based on the file’s path, just like what happened when the template was created. The Gardener looks for a template with the right domain in the same release series. If it finds one, presto: it’s got the template that the upload is meant for. If not, then the Gardener tries a few other things and if nothing works, simply keeps the upload on the queue.

So the entry doesn’t get imported, but usually the Gardener can’t give any single reason: all it knows is that it tried many ways of matching the file to a template and none of them worked. Maybe it’s an error; maybe it’s just a matter of waiting for the right template to be created.

So what’s changed?

The new error message is about “approval conflicts.” You’ll see it when there is ”more than one” matching template for your upload. This can happen because your project’s directory structure is unusual and Launchpad can’t extract a meaningful domain from it. Or a template’s domain may have been changed, or an old deactivated template is reactivated when a new one has already taken its place.

Whatever the cause, the new error message tells you that this has happened, and what the matching templates are. It’s up to you to decide what needs to be done about it:

How much you can do, of course, depends on the permisisons you have. Only the project’s owners (and Launchpad’s administrators) can deactivate templates or change their domains. But you can always delete your own uploads if you want to upload your file differently: on the import-queue page, click on Needs Review and select Deleted instead.

Let us know

There’s still plenty more we’d like to do to make imports easier and more efficient, if we can find the time. But I hope this small change will make your life a little easier.

Is this error message working for you? Is it helpful? Are you seeing a lot of these errors, or none at all where you were expecting them? Is the explanation unclear? Do you see something happen for lots of people that we could fix in the same way? Please get in touch:

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